Needs Testing

Cool little Easter Eggs on websites are always greatly appreciated. Jokes aside, helpful error messages are very important for both usability and accessibility.
Filling out forms can be one of the most frustrating exercises on the Web, and making sure that users know and understand exactly what you are expecting from them, and allowing them to enter their information naturally and intuitively greatly helps ease that experience.
From an accessibility perspective, that which cannot be seen is as important as that which can. The presence and correct use of <label> tags can make a world of difference to the visually impaired.
Well, that’s cast rather a gloom over the evening, hasn’t it?
Always look on the bright side of life *whistles* :-)

Cool little Easter Eggs on websites are always greatly appreciated. Jokes aside, helpful error messages are very important for both usability and accessibility.

Filling out forms can be one of the most frustrating exercises on the Web, and making sure that users know and understand exactly what you are expecting from them, and allowing them to enter their information naturally and intuitively greatly helps ease that experience.

From an accessibility perspective, that which cannot be seen is as important as that which can. The presence and correct use of <label> tags can make a world of difference to the visually impaired.

Well, that’s cast rather a gloom over the evening, hasn’t it?

Always look on the bright side of life *whistles* :-)

patricklaughingalonewithshuckle:

I found this in an ad in my newspaper this morning.

I’d wager that most people above the age of 40 will struggle to see what the joke is here. For those who aren’t fans of rap music, the artist Eminem is most certainly NOT black, so his inclusion in a roster of artists celebrating “Black History Month” paints the company involved as ignorant at best, and outright offensive at worst.

Maybe you’re a developer or working with a diverse group of stakeholders, or a designer working on multiple product categories. You can’t be an expert on everything, but the customers that the product is targeted at are, and they WILL notice. Therefore testing with real customers ensures that you bring in the real experts - your customers - to make sure that mistakes like this one are caught before they damage your reputation.

(Source: megashuckles)

39 notes

iluvenis:

bones or….

Here&#8217;s a problem that really should have been identified at the design stage. The value of testing increases the earlier its done. Once a product goes into development - or worse, manufacturing - the cost of change increases greatly. A common misconception is that testing exists purely to identify and fix bugs, but it is also possible to test with customers in the planning and design phase, using techniques such as surveys, prototyping/wireframes and much more.
Letting customer insights drive your project right from the start ensures that your product or service will deliver a quality customer experience&#8230; and avoid letting them make the mistake of pinning their documents with little wire penises.

iluvenis:

bones or….

Here’s a problem that really should have been identified at the design stage. The value of testing increases the earlier its done. Once a product goes into development - or worse, manufacturing - the cost of change increases greatly. A common misconception is that testing exists purely to identify and fix bugs, but it is also possible to test with customers in the planning and design phase, using techniques such as surveys, prototyping/wireframes and much more.

Letting customer insights drive your project right from the start ensures that your product or service will deliver a quality customer experience… and avoid letting them make the mistake of pinning their documents with little wire penises.

(Source: garagedump)

20 notes

xinsight:

Hilarious sign to fix a poorly designed bathroom door: “Don’t test that the door is locked by pushing on the door handle or you will unlock it.”

This reminds me of products which have been oversimplified. This quote, commonly attributed to Einstein, sums it up perfectly: &#8220;Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.&#8221; Removing visual information can actually make some things more complicated, and it&#8217;s not until you&#8217;ve tested with real customers that you discover where the crossover point between simplicity and usability lies.

xinsight:

Hilarious sign to fix a poorly designed bathroom door: “Don’t test that the door is locked by pushing on the door handle or you will unlock it.”

This reminds me of products which have been oversimplified. This quote, commonly attributed to Einstein, sums it up perfectly: “Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.” Removing visual information can actually make some things more complicated, and it’s not until you’ve tested with real customers that you discover where the crossover point between simplicity and usability lies.

(Source: xinsight)

2 notes

Another building video. A couple of weeks ago I was posted on a project in Melbourne. I was booked on a 6:30am flight, which meant I had to get up around 4am to get ready and be at the airport in time. Then I clocked a full day of work at the office.

So when I checked in at the Mantra@100 that afternoon, I was well and truly tired. The hotel allocated me room 601 and handed me the key. I took the lift up to the 6th floor, and I see… well, you can see in the video that I took later that evening (after dinner, a shower and a long nap).

My zany colleague aside, you can see on the wall 602, then 603-610. Where’s 601? I look around… rooms, corridor, stairwell/service door, lifts. No 601. Oh wait… that’s it up the other end. You probably can’t see in the video, but the “sign” for 601 is at the end of the row of pictures, completely separate to the other numbers. It also doesn’t help that the room numbers are marked right up in the top corner of their doors.

Grouping information in a logical fashion helps customers to understand your information architecture (or physical architecture, in this case!) It makes little sense to isolate one number from the rest of the sequence. Even if the number was at the other side of the gap, it would still be of close-enough proximity… but to put it at the end of the row of pictures, at a great distance to the rest, is just silly.

I call this issue &#8220;it don&#8217;t make cents&#8221;. Not meaning to pick on Moreton Bay Council or anything, they just happen to be using a payment system (NAB Transact) that contains this problem.
In this image you can see that the &#8220;Amount to Pay&#8221; field contains a separate box for cents. God knows why this is necessary, and brings to mind the possibility that some people might carelessly type &#8220;5&#8221; there expecting it to be interpreted 0.5 - i.e. fifty cents (after all, that&#8217;s how I usually enter it in Excel spreadsheets). However, it could also be interpreted as five cents.
Fortunately, the system includes a validation script that prevents single-digit cents from being entered. But if they&#8217;re going to check it anyway, wouldn&#8217;t it have been easier just to have a single field for &#8220;Amount to Pay&#8221;?
Maybe there is a legitimate reason why one might need to separate dollars and cents; please do enlighten me if you know of any.

I call this issue “it don’t make cents”. Not meaning to pick on Moreton Bay Council or anything, they just happen to be using a payment system (NAB Transact) that contains this problem.

In this image you can see that the “Amount to Pay” field contains a separate box for cents. God knows why this is necessary, and brings to mind the possibility that some people might carelessly type “5” there expecting it to be interpreted 0.5 - i.e. fifty cents (after all, that’s how I usually enter it in Excel spreadsheets). However, it could also be interpreted as five cents.

Fortunately, the system includes a validation script that prevents single-digit cents from being entered. But if they’re going to check it anyway, wouldn’t it have been easier just to have a single field for “Amount to Pay”?

Maybe there is a legitimate reason why one might need to separate dollars and cents; please do enlighten me if you know of any.

132 notes

This is what you get when you let an OCD developer design your forms. I can&#8217;t think of any conceivable use a company could have for recording such precise detail. Plus, the list will forever be incomplete - what if I&#8217;m a Senator, Captain, Lieutenant, or one of any number of titles that they&#8217;ve missed? 
In her book Talk to the Hand, author Lynne Truss writes:

Having ticked &#8220;Other&#8221; on a number of application forms, I now receive post bizarrely addressed to &#8220;Other Lynne Truss&#8221;, which is a bit unsettling for someone with a rocky sense of identity.

Forcing users to select from a long list of items takes time, and detracts even more from the already annoying process of completing a form.

This is what you get when you let an OCD developer design your forms. I can’t think of any conceivable use a company could have for recording such precise detail. Plus, the list will forever be incomplete - what if I’m a Senator, Captain, Lieutenant, or one of any number of titles that they’ve missed? 

In her book Talk to the Hand, author Lynne Truss writes:

Having ticked “Other” on a number of application forms, I now receive post bizarrely addressed to “Other Lynne Truss”, which is a bit unsettling for someone with a rocky sense of identity.

Forcing users to select from a long list of items takes time, and detracts even more from the already annoying process of completing a form.

kedlopez:

hahahaha Asian stores 

You might think your customers won&#8217;t notice little things like typos, but they do. Interestly, a spellcheck wouldn&#8217;t have helped in this instance since &#8220;sweeter&#8221; is a completely valid, and correctly spelled, word. That&#8217;s why we recommend human factor testing in all of our jobs, since there are certain things that automated testing won&#8217;t find.

kedlopez:

hahahaha Asian stores 

You might think your customers won’t notice little things like typos, but they do. Interestly, a spellcheck wouldn’t have helped in this instance since “sweeter” is a completely valid, and correctly spelled, word. That’s why we recommend human factor testing in all of our jobs, since there are certain things that automated testing won’t find.

1 note

fly-little-bird-fly:

FAIL

A very common &#8220;Engrish&#8221; problem, where a hastily designed product is being rolled off Chinese/Phillipino/Slovakian/etc. factory assembly lines with scant thought given to whether the words and pictures make sense combined together. It would literally take an English-literate employee 5 seconds during the planning stage to fix it.
This illustrates the impact of catching usability flaws as early as possible in the design phase - a small amount of effort leads to a great amount of customer impact, and the difference between whether your product is a success, or a laughing stock.

fly-little-bird-fly:

FAIL

A very common “Engrish” problem, where a hastily designed product is being rolled off Chinese/Phillipino/Slovakian/etc. factory assembly lines with scant thought given to whether the words and pictures make sense combined together. It would literally take an English-literate employee 5 seconds during the planning stage to fix it.

This illustrates the impact of catching usability flaws as early as possible in the design phase - a small amount of effort leads to a great amount of customer impact, and the difference between whether your product is a success, or a laughing stock.

15 notes

adorkable24:

Wait…what brand is this?

adorkable24:

Wait…what brand is this?

9 notes